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HIV Psychiatry Video Presentations

These video presentations provide psychiatrists and other mental health practitioners with an overview of some of the psychiatric disorders commonly found in patients with HIV and AIDS. Treating these comorbidities is critical to promoting antiretroviral medication adherence, assuring secondary prevention, and improving patients’ quality of life.


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Use of PrEP for Clients at High Risk of HIV

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Despite the significant advances in the knowledge and treatment of HIV/AIDS, it remains responsible for a worldwide epidemic. In the United States the rate of new infections has been steady at approximately 50,000 per year. In an effort to decrease new infections, various interventions have been developed including the use of anti retroviral medications such as pre exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) in HIV uninfected individuals to prevent the acquisition of the virus. Duration: 1 hour, 30 Minutes

This activity is a mechanism to claim credit for viewing the webinar presentation through EDC's Training Resources website. Participants will need to enter the Group ID code provided at the end of the presentation to unlock this activity, complete the quiz and evaluation, and claim and print a certificate.

This webinar is provided as a collaborative effort between the American Psychiatric Association and the HIV/AIDS and Mental Health Training Resource Center. The HIV/AIDS and Mental Health Training Resource Center aims to expand the knowledge and capacity of mental health care providers to address the mental health and psychosocial needs of consumers impacted and affected by HIV. This is done as a partnership between the Education Development Center, American Psychological Association, American Psychiatric Association, and National Association of Social Workers.

The Center is funded under a task order from the Department of Health and Human Services, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), Center for Mental Health Services. Reference #283-12-2401. This webinar is offered for training and technical assistance purposes only. The content, views and opinions expressed do not necessarily reflect those of SAMHSA or HHS.


HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorders (HAND)

Although AIDS is primarily an immune system disorder, it also affects the nervous system and can lead to a wide range of severe neurological disorders causing such symptoms such as confusion and forgetfulness, behavioral changes, headaches, and/or progressive weakness. Cognitive motor impairment or damage to the peripheral nerves is also common. Such complications occur in more than 40% of patients with HIV infection. These disorders may be caused, directly or indirectly, by HIV itself or by infectious, autoimmune, or neoplastic processes secondary to immunodeficiency. Some neurologic conditions are even caused by antiretroviral drugs. Symptoms become more frequent and severe as the immune system declines and symptomatic illness and AIDS ensue. This session will provide a brief overview of the clinical manifestations, differential diagnosis, and treatment of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders, including HIV-associated minor neurocognitive disorder and HIV-associated dementia. Duration: 30 Minutes

This video was originally recorded at the 165th American Psychiatric Association Annual Meeting on May 7th, 2012 in Philadelphia, PA.

This educational program made possible with support from the Center for Mental Health Services/Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration under contract number HHSS 280 2009 00003C.  The views expressed do not necessarily reflect the official policies of the Department of Health and Human Services; nor does mention of trade names, commercial practices, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government. Please complete the brief evaluation form so that we may continue to offer these online videos at no charge. Feedback Form


Mood Disorders in HIV

Mood Disorders are very common in patients with HIV and form the bulk of the psychiatric complications of HIV infection. They can occur at any time during the illness and range from mild to life threatening. In addition, mood disorders rarely occur in isolation and are often associated with other psychiatric illnesses, substance use, and of course, the underlying HIV illness. These disorders can have profound effects on partners, caretakers, family and friends. Managing mood disorders are best addressed by a comprehensive plan and adaptable to the variable and changing needs of the patient. Current treatments, which can be used individually or in combination, are often very effective. During this session participants will examine the range of mood disorders and review available treatment options. Duration 23 Minutes.

This video was originally recorded at the 165th American Psychiatric Association Annual Meeting on May 7th, 2012 in Philadelphia, PA.

This educational program made possible with support from the Center for Mental Health Services/Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration under contract number HHSS 280 2009 00003C. The views expressed do not necessarily reflect the official policies of the Department of Health and Human Services; nor does mention of trade names, commercial practices, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government. Please complete the brief evaluation form at the link below so that we may continue to offer these online videos at no charge. Feedback Form.


Psychosis and HIV

Psychosis in HIV is a generic term for any one of a number of symptomatic manifestations of thought disorders. The presence of psychosis in patients with HIV disease can contribute to difficulties in medical care, delays in diagnosis, tense relationships between health care providers and patients, and poor understanding of illness and treatment options. As with depressive syndromes, psychotic disorders may be made worse by medications, metabolic abnormalities, or HIV infection itself. During this session participants will review diagnostic options for distinguishing among thought disorders, discuss the use of antipsychotics, and examine useful tools for working with patients to successfully manage their illness. Duration: 30 minutes.

This video was originally recorded at the 165th American Psychiatric Association Annual Meeting on May 7th, 2012 in Philadelphia, PA.

This educational program made possible with support from the Center for Mental Health Services/Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration under contract number HHSS 280 2009 00003C.  The views expressed do not necessarily reflect the official policies of the Department of Health and Human Services; nor does mention of trade names, commercial practices, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government. Please complete the brief evaluation form at the link below so that we may continue to offer these online videos at no charge. Feedback Form


HIV and Anxiety Disorders

Anxiety is a common symptom in HIV-infected patients. When anxiety symptoms are severe or persistent, patients may have an anxiety disorder. These disorders include panic disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), social phobia and other phobias, obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), or acute stress disorder and anxiety disorder due to a general medical condition. Some of these anxiety disorders, for example OCD, will occur in people with HIV no more frequently than in the general population. Other disorders, including PTSD, can be prompted or exacerbated by the experience of HIV, especially when there is already an underlying proclivity toward the disorder. Patients with other psychiatric disorders, such as adjustment disorders, major depression, psychosis, or substance use disorders, can also present with significant anxiety. During this session participants will examine the differences among these specific disorders, understand the recurrence of anxiety symptoms during the course of HIV illness, and review treatment options. Duration: 27 minutes.

This video was originally recorded at the 165th American Psychiatric Association Annual Meeting on May 7th, 2012 in Philadelphia, PA.

This educational program made possible with support from the Center for Mental Health Services/Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration under contract number HHSS 280 2009 00003C. The views expressed do not necessarily reflect the official policies of the Department of Health and Human Services; nor does mention of trade names, commercial practices, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government. Please complete the brief evaluation form at the link below so that we may continue to offer these online videos at no charge. Feedback Form


Sleep Disorders and HIV

Patients with HIV or AIDS are more likely to complain of sleep difficulties than are patients with other medical illnesses. However, clinicians may not always register the seriousness of disrupted sleep. It is important for medical professionals treating patients with HIV disease to take complaints of disrupted sleep seriously, since such complaints are associated with an increased risk of depression, pain, and substance abuse. Sleep disorders are highly prevalent in the HIV seropositive population, and have been demonstrated to be a primary contributor to non-adherence to HIV retroviral regimens. More importantly, sleep has been demonstrated to be a powerful predictor of both co-morbid psychiatric illnesses as well as medical co-morbidities. Emerging evidence links impaired sleep quality to inflammatory cytokines that may contribute negatively to overall health status. This session will review common disorders of sleep initiation and sleep maintenance including primary insomnia, sleep disorders secondary to either HIV or other co-morbid medical and psychiatric conditions, and treatments for the various sleep disorders.

This video was originally recorded at the 165th American Psychiatric Association Annual Meeting on May 7th, 2012 in Philadelphia, PA.

This educational program made possible with support from the Center for Mental Health Services/Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration under contract number HHSS 280 2009 00003C.  The views expressed do not necessarily reflect the official policies of the Department of Health and Human Services; nor does mention of trade names, commercial practices, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government. Please complete the brief evaluation form at the link below so that we may continue to offer these online videos at no charge. Feedback Form

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